A DAY WITH THE JUDGES

 

National Mid-Year Conference Co-Sponsored by the ACLM and WILM

Professional Ethics, Marijuana (Cannabis) and Opioid Crisis

 Up to 12 Hours CME; 7 Hours CLE 

Friday, October 18, 2019, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Course Fee $275.00

10% Discount ($247.50) for Early Bird Seminar Registration

 

Supplemental Pre-Course Materials

Additional Six (6) hours of CME

ABOUT THESE ENDURING MATERIALS
 

The Supplemental Pre-Course Materials for Medical Ethics and Professionalism include Practical Medical Ethics and Professionalism.


The topics listed under the Table of Contents below depict medically ethical, medical-legal, and risk management principles that can protect patients and clinicians.  The materials will be emailed to registrants two weeks before October 23, 2020.

 

Successful completion of this program result in earning an additional six (6) continuing medical education hours.  It requires the following:

  1. Study of the pre-course supplemental written materials.

  2. Successful completion of a test on these written materials during attendance at the A DAY WITH THE JUDGES CONFERENCE,October 23, 2020.

  3. Completion of the Enduring Materials page in the Accreditation Manual during attendance at the A DAY WITH THE JUDGES CONFERENCE,October 23, 2020.  A written objective test will be given at the lunch break.  A 70% passing grade is required for the award of the additional six continuing medical education credit hours for your study of these written materials.


Successful completion of the test is required to satisfy state licensing board mandates.

TO REGISTER: Please go to HOME page, and click on the button REGISTER NOW.

In case of problems, email sandysanbar@gmail.com your name, address and telephone number.  Will be register and bill.

TABLE OF CONTENT

I. INTRODUCTION – Medical Ethics History and Problems

1. Medically ethical conduct defined and explained.


II. ACTIONS REQUIRING SPECIAL CARE – Process of Making Ethical Decisions

2. Utilizing placebo effect.


III. CLINICIAN-ATTORNEY INTERACTIONS – How to Handle Ethical Issues

3. Ethical conduct expected of clinicians when interacting with attorneys in legal matters involving their patients.

4. Ethical conduct expected of a medical witness or expected of a medical consultant to an attorney or the court.


IV. BUSINESS RELATIONS

5. Ethical challenges arising from business competition with other clinicians.

6. Ethical conduct in relations between clinicians and their present and former partners, employers, and employees.

7. Ethical conduct by occupational clinicians pressured by patients' employers to protect the employers' interests.


V. ECONOMICALLY MOTIVATED CONDUCT

8. Protecting a hospital's income at the patient's expense.

9. Protecting the clinician's managed care participation at the patient's expense.

10. Ethical risks of giving pharmaceutical company-sponsored lectures.


VI. INADEQUATE MEASURES

11. Failure to accommodate to differences in cultural/ethnic background, race, language, religion, or socio-economic status of patients.

12. Lack of an effective continuous quality improvement program.

13. Inadequate warnings to patients regarding drug-related risks from concomitant use of other substances.

14. Inadequate measurement of clinical findings.

15. Failure to prepare adequate printed handouts for patients.


VII. MEDICAL RECORD KEEPING

16. Delayed and anticipatory record keeping.

17. Jousting in the medical records.

18. Misleading record keeping by patient labeling.

19. Defensive record keeping.

20. Inadequate review of prior patient records.

VIII. BIAS

21. Inaccurate and disparaging comments about alternative medicine.

22. Overuse of alternative medicine practitioners.

23.Patients who show general lack of confidence in clinicians or medical science.

24.Patients involved in litigation or seeking compensation who may be motivated to enhance their symptoms for secondary gain.

25.Hypochondriacs.

26.Patients who strongly or belligerently disagree with their clinician about appropriate care.

27.Patients with concurrent mental health disorders or difficult traits that interfere with care.

28.Patients with poor anger or hostility control.

29.Non-compliant patients.

30.Patients who intentionally place themselves in situations where harm is likely.

31.Patients who are a danger to others.

32.Patients for whom no long-term benefit is likely.

33.Over-assertive spouses, parents, or other family members.

34.Drug-seeking patients.


IX. MEASURES TO MINIMIZE RISKSOF NEGLIGENTLY INJURING PATIENTS

35.Unethical failure to take measures to decrease the risks of negligently injuring patients.

36.Patient history measures.

37.Patient teaching measures.

38.Measures appropriate for supervisory responsibilities.

39.Medical equipment measures.

40.Measures appropriate for administered medications.

41.Measures for continuing education of the clinician.

42.Measures to reduce office systems errors.

43.Miscellaneous measures to prevent patient injuries.

 

X. OTHER ETHICAL MISCONDUCT

44.Criminal misconduct arising from or relating to health care practice.

45.Unprofessional use of social media or social networking.


X. NEWER ETHICAL ISSUES AFFECTING DOCTORS